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Burna Boy: Grammy So Easy, Yet So Difficult To Win

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I have been a lover of country music since my college days.

As “Sakara and Fuji” are to Yorubas, so is country music to Americans. Country music has its root in the United States.

As a matter of fact, this music is regarded as the culture of the whites with only but a few black Americans singing it.

As a teenager, I listened to Don Williams but as I grew older such legends like Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Dolly Parton wormed themselves into my heart.

There are great country music stars now that have won the most prestigious Grammy awards.

Year in year out, America churns out iconic country music stars. This is what the white Americans know how to do best, so they hardly compete with the blacks who are kings of hip hop.

They dominated the country music scenes and cart away almost all the prizes in this area.

A few days ago, I was watching the video of Alison Krauss’ “Trying to get over you” in a duet with Vince Gill.

This song was originally sung by Vince Gill but listening to Alison Krauss version, I became so emotional to the point of shedding some tears.

Not only because of the lyrics but because of the star studded members of the band that gives the four minutes rendition.

All of them on stage singing “Trying to get over you” together have won 105 Grammy Awards.

On that stage, AK has 28, Vince 21, Jerry Douglas 14, Dan Tyminski 14, Ron Block 14, Barry Bales 14.

Wow, 105 Grammy awards winners singing a single song.

I guess this has not only come through hardwork but also because this type of song is theirs. They own it, eat it and play it.

It becomes so easy for them to churn out Grammy products every year.

You may say that Grammy is made for the Americans, no, Africans also win.

As a matter fact, Angeliq Kidjo, our own sister from Republic of Benin has won it four times.

Her album, “Celia” knocked out the chance of Burna Boy to clinch this year grammy.

With Burna Boy losing out, it has increased the number of Nigerian nominees for Grammy to nine but none has won the prestigious award.

The first nominee was the late Afro music legend, Fela Anikukapo Kuti after which King Sunny Ade, juju music maestro was nominated twice but never won.

Sunny Ade would have won but was denied by late Jamaica Raggae star, Bob Marley in the 1980s.

Four times, Femi Anikukapo Kuti was nominated but never won after which his brother Seun was also nominated.

Back in Nigeria, Grammy has eluded our singers, except Sikiru Adepoju, a percussionist whose dexterous use of talking drum won him a grammy a few years ago.

Adepoju played behind the Juju music legend, Chief Ebenezer Obey before leaving for the United States.

Of course, there are a few Grammy winners of Nigeria descent, the organisers of the awards never recognised them as Nigerians.

Adepoju the only Nigerian who had won Grammy was not celebrated back home perhaps because he is not a musician but a drummer.

His culture excelled him just as the country music has excelled many Americans. Our artists must embrace more musics that promote the African culture. In this, Grammy will come.

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